“DO NOT MIX” – Label is just a part of truth

Manufactures may warn what they think danger, but they don’t always consider users to judge how danger the product is, or they don’t always warn what they have to. (Photos are not related to this article.)

Have you bleached and you touched the liquid? If not, do it now! It is clammy. Wash your hands right after you do, otherwise your hands may dissolved!

Bleach is available all over the world, and it should be kept away from children in many families. Do you think bleach is dangerous? No matter if you answer yes or no, please think about the reasons why it is safe and why it is dangerous. You may find enough reasons for both answers.

What is truly danger is not bleach itself, but not knowing what bleach does. If children put bleach first on their hands, they would be interested that bleach is clammy. Adults know it is because of a chemical reaction. They keep eyes on children not to use bleach.

Bleach tells us two more things. This is not just luck to me, but stories are considerable.

First of all, there is no alert about the chemical reaction on the label. The alert written in a big font on the label is the famous phrase “DO NOT MIX”. The label also says “Mixing bleach with acid-based detergents causes harmful gas.” The label also says “Wash carefully when you have bleach on your skin.” But there is no explanation what happens if it is on my skin. There is no way to judge how dangerous it is.

Secondary, there is no explanation about acid-based materials. Imagine a possibility that a person who just used soap uses bleach too. Don’t you think it is highly possible? Actually, soap is acid. Soap may react chemically and makes chlorine gas! (But I haven’t verified it yet.) The problem is soap and acid-based detergents don’t say “DO NOT MIX”. I don’t know why. To tell the truth, I’m not good at chemistry! (LOL)

The reason why I said stories are considerable is because these can be applied perfectly to the security issues. This means manufactures may warn what they think danger, but they don’t always consider users to judge how danger the product is, or they don’t always warn what they have to.

Remember:

  • What is truly danger is not products themselves, but not knowing what they do.
  • Manufactures don’t always consider users to judge how danger the product is.
  • Manufactures don’t always warn what they have to.

If you are interested in this post, following posts may be helpful.

This post is also available in: Japanese

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